23, and not quite sure of things.

I like the sound of footsteps on gravel, and waking up to rain.

The latest narrative film I worked on with Andre and Luna a few months ago. A 79 second film to be made in 79 hours, for entry to Cathay Motion Picture Awards 2014 to the theme “Sisters”. Nominated for the finals, but alas, did not make it to the top 3.

Thank you also to the Little Red Ants for lending me their monopod and releasing me during this period.

 Betty and Karen, “I’m not Satisfied”
from Nevver

likeafieldmouse:

Johnny Savage - Fallout

Artist’s statement:

Fallout is a series of photographs that considers the modern Irish landscape; a landscape where empty buildings stand like ruins, reminders of another time or place in history. Appearing like portals to a different world, they quietly haunt the periphery of towns and cities, anonymous, the same, in a limbo of dream and reality…”

(via todayonhiatus)


“Wong’s chief inspiration for Chungking Express was a short story entitled ‘On Seeing the 100% Perfect Girl One Beautiful April Morning’ by the Japanese novelist Haruki Murakami. The story is about the mutability of perceptions, and begins with the sentence, ‘One fine April morning, I passed my 100% woman on a Harajuku back street.’ Chungking Express similarly begins with a chance encounter, which becomes a motif in the first episode…Wong develops the themes of chimerical relationships with the same evanescence displayed in Murakami’s short story. People’s lives just touch but never interpenetrate (maybe they do not even touch but just brush past, mere possibilities, foregone opportunities to connect, impermanence). Like Murakami, Wong injects a sense of magical element into everyday life but with a sense of fatal consequences. Like Murakami, he invokes icons from popular culture to suggest the part that memory plays.” (From Wong Kar-wai by Stephen Teo, 50-51)

“Wong’s chief inspiration for Chungking Express was a short story entitled ‘On Seeing the 100% Perfect Girl One Beautiful April Morning’ by the Japanese novelist Haruki Murakami. The story is about the mutability of perceptions, and begins with the sentence, ‘One fine April morning, I passed my 100% woman on a Harajuku back street.’ Chungking Express similarly begins with a chance encounter, which becomes a motif in the first episode…

Wong develops the themes of chimerical relationships with the same evanescence displayed in Murakami’s short story. People’s lives just touch but never interpenetrate (maybe they do not even touch but just brush past, mere possibilities, foregone opportunities to connect, impermanence). Like Murakami, Wong injects a sense of magical element into everyday life but with a sense of fatal consequences. Like Murakami, he invokes icons from popular culture to suggest the part that memory plays.”

(From Wong Kar-wai by Stephen Teo, 50-51)

(Source: pink-bullets, via unicornbots)